Wednesday, June 6, 2012

Trying out Annie Sloan paint

Hey there! First of all, have you seen the 400 awesome before and after projects linked up this month? Fantastic! (You can see them here.)

But come back soon cause I want to show you a fun little project. ;)

I was lucky enough to get the chance to attend an Annie Sloan Chalk Paint™ Workshop a few weeks ago at a fun shop called ReStyled here in central Indiana. I’ve never used this paint and was thrilled to get a chance to try it out!

Sasha at ReStyled was totally thorough and definitely an Annie Sloan expert. This paint is super easy to use, but there are some different techniques and ways of doing things, so the hands on experience was really helpful.

I came home all amped up with plans of painting all kinds of stuff in the house running through my head! And then I couldn’t decide on just the right item to start out with, until I noticed the Goodwill stool that’s been sitting in the garage for a year now:

goodwill stool redo

I decided it would be the perfect item for me to experiment on. Buwhaahahaha.

Taps fingers together, cackles.

OK, it wasn’t really like that, it was more like a squeal, some clapping and a little hop because I was so excited to have finally decided on something. ;)

I kept hearing that you don’t have to do any prep with this paint – no sanding, no priming. It was so hard for me to believe, but I didn’t do anything to this stool other than clean it off.

I wanted to do a little layering of colors, and used the free samples I got from the workshop. I started with the Paris Grey color:

annie sloan paris grey

I used a regular paint brush and went to town – and that’s when I realized one of the bonuses of this paint – it goes on so easily and it shows brush marks:

painting with annie sloan chalk paint

Yes, I said brush marks are a good thing.

So let me tell you, that part was a little hard for me. For years all I’ve done is try to avoid brush marks. So it’s a little hard to get used to and it’s definitely a “look” – if you don’t like this look it may not be for you. I gotta say I loved it in the end, so hang in there if the brush marks are giving you hives. :)

Anyway, I kind of liked that look on a piece like this, because I went into it knowing it didn’t need to be perfect. I just brushed the paint on and didn’t worry about making it super smooth.

Another thing you need to get used to – this paint dries FAST. Really fast. You do need to watch that you get each spot well enough the first time so you don’t have to go back over it – it will “pull” a bit. This is the case for any paint though – you just need to work a bit quicker than with a latex.

I was inspired by another smaller stool I already have, so I cut out a “1” on my Silhouette machine and stuck ‘er on:

stencil on stool

I realized later that I was so focused on making sure the number was centered on the top that I didn’t center it on the rungs of the stool. Drats. It’s only slightly off but that’s enough to drive me slightly nutty. :)

I left the stencil on, then painted the whole chair with my second color, Duck Egg Blue – then I peeled off the stencil.

I was left with the grey color showing through, and it was time to sand:

I started with a fine grit sandpaper and ended using a medium grit to really get it distressed. As always, I went for the spots that would normally get some wear and tear:

distressing paint

I went a little lighter on some spots with it so it just brought some of the grey through, instead of down to the wood.

If a piece is going to get any kind of wear, you really need to use the soft wax on it as a final step. A frame would be fine just to paint and hang, but a table, chair, anything like that, should be finished off with a wax:

annie sloan soft wax

You can see above that the wax deepens the color, which I liked a lot. It made it the perfect blue color! And of course it deepens the wood grain color coming through the distressing.

You really need to mush that wax into the piece – I just swirled it around all over. The nice thing is you can easily see where it’s covering. It also rocks that you barely have to use any wax:

annie sloan soft wax

You want to make sure to not leave a film on the piece – it needs to be wiped down thoroughly. Sasha at ReStyled showed us how if you can run your finger across it and see a mark where you did so, there’s still too much on the item.

If you leave too much on there it will take forever to dry, or may not dry completely. Because of this you don’t have to use much at all -- I barely even touched my wax for this project. I have no doubt the one container of wax will last me years and years.

The wax protects the paint and the surface, much like a poly. I liked the finish when I was done – it’s very smooth to the touch and you can just tell it’s a protective finish by feeling it:

painting goodwill stool annie sloan

I ADORE this little stool and how it turned out! I love the color, the distressing, the No. 1 on the top:

No. 1

So darn cute!! You can see what I’m talking about with the brush marks in the pic above. It doesn’t bother me at all on this stool, but I’ll have to see how I feel about it on a bigger piece, like a dresser.

In the end, I loved this paint! I was a little surprised – I’m not sure why. It’s very easy to use. And there’s so many cool looks and techniques possible because of the layering of colors, the way it distresses, the dark wax option…and I LOVE that you can use it on anything without prep work. From what I understand, it can go right on top of oil or latex paint.

The next item I want to use it on is oil-based, so I’ll let you know how that goes. :)

There is the cost issue of this paint though – I used samples for the stool and it is true what I’ve heard, you need to use very little. I did one coat of each color and both covered beautifully. I’ve heard over and over that one quart will paint numerous pieces – so that is a good thing. So…I until I try it out on a bigger item I can’t speak to that. And you can skip primer so that is a cost saver…

Overall? I will be using it again. I’m excited to try it out on a dresser in our bedroom, so I’ll be sure to share more about that project.

I really loved how it transformed a regular stool:

Here’s the before and after:

So fun!!

Have you tried the Annie Sloan paint? What have you used it on? Sasha from ReStyled has offered to answer any questions you might have – so if you want more info on anything, ask away in the comments! Sasha will answer you back there. :)

67 comments:

  1. Great color and a great look! I still haven't tried it, but am quite tempted when I see projects like this. Trying to stay focused on the bajillion (unfinished) projects around here first. ;-). So. Very. Difficult.

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  2. I just did my very first table with ASCP last week: http://pinterest-project.blogspot.com/2012/05/getting-to-know-annie-sloan.html

    I LOVED it - planning a trip back to the store for more already! Your stool looks great, I am loving that blue color.

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  3. The stool looks GREAT!!! I have some questions:

    1) How long, if at all, should you wait between coats?

    2) What type of brush should be used?

    3) What is the overall drying time?

    4) Is there a bad smell? Like if I did it inside, would my house smell like paint?

    5) Can it be used on walls?

    6) How often do you have to put on a coat of wax? Just once, or every year, etc? If so, do you strip the old wax down and re-do or just brush wax on over the paint?

    Thanks!!!!

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  4. I absolutely love the way this stool turned out!! It looks aged and vintage...like it has a soul. Like it's been owned by generations of family members, and you're the lucky owner now. I've never used chalk paint. I keep hearing about it, and now I think I have to try it. Also, look at your cute puppy! Oh my gosh...what a shot! :) Last thing...love the bluish wood box on your sofa table (with the rope handles). Did you make that (if so, how did I miss it?). So cool. Hope you're having a great week!!

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  5. I am completely in L.O.V.E. with ASCP and have completed many projects -- with SO Much ease compared to before I met Annie.
    Tickled to see another chalk paint project -- so thank you for sharing. I linked up my Moody Blues Wall Art Makeover, but have other ASCP on my site as well. http://vhumblenest.blogspot.com

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  6. Ok, I will admit it right here and right now.... I am so sad, nay almost despondent!! I have been looking and asking and pleading trying to find someone in our neck of the woods who carries ASCP and would be doing a workshop but to no avail... :( and to find out just down the road there was a workshop.... oh the horror.

    Okay now that the drama is over... especially since I am practically dancing with glee to discover more workshops!! (now I have to save every penny I earn... to attend!)

    1. Can the brushes be used with a natural wax? i.e one made with natural oils such as olive/walnut & beeswax

    2. must it be covered with a wax for protection?

    Thank you so very much for sharing!!! g'night!!

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  7. LOVE this!! Im kinda addicted to ASCP. I've used it many times since I love the look of brush strokes (plus I hate to sand & prime!). Great job!!!

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  8. I just started using ASCP a couple of months ago, and I really love it. It's SO easy to work with and SO durable, one the wax is on. I can just tell that it will age gracefully instead of peeling or chipping with wear.

    Just a note, for those who can't attend a workshop or don't live near a stockist: some stockists will ship it to you. That's probably expensive, too, but it's very worth it.

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  9. Just a suggestion to get a perfectly smooth finish with chalk paint. If I want a dresser or a china cupboard to be smooth after I finish painting but before I wax, I use a fine grit sanding block to smooth out the brush strokes when I use Annie Sloan paint. The result finishes as smooth as glass and little prep work.

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  10. Very cute!!! What kind of wax are you using? New to this while DIY painting wood thing. Can't wait to try it. I'll have a whole new house to decorate in a few weeks!

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  11. The stool looks great! I have used ASCP on LOADS of projects and love it! One tip-if you find that the paint drags you can just wet the tip of your brush and smooth it out-a benefit of ASCP vs. regular. I have found that the cost is probably CHEAPER than a traditional method because you don't have to use primer + paint and the man hours are wayyyy less! I have used it on heavily lacquered furniture, metal, tile and wood. All wear beautifully. Some pieces I have not distressed and they are gorgeous, too, a rich matte color. You also don't have to use sandpaper to distress-you can just use a damp cloth and wipe off where you wish-eliminating a dusty mess. Went to see Annie Sloan during her US tour earlier this spring! Love your blog!

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  12. I love, love, love ASCP! I have just painted my second piece and will be sharing soon...and let me tell you, it is a testament to the power of the paint, a laminate desk with a burn mark on top...covered in one coat and looks FABULOUS! Took me less than an hour, well worth the cost of the paint!
    Love your blog and follow you on Pinterest, too!

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  13. Can you use it on stuff other than wood? I have some Billy bookcases I want to paint.

    Great tutorial!

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  14. WELL written, and fantastic pictures! I hope you do not mind me linking it up to my blog, as it is a wonderful testament of the Chalk Paint (TM) and I loved it!
    Thanks!

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  15. My neighbor used this on her kitchen cabinets. Now you have me interested. I will have to think of a project to use it on...hmmm

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  16. I love your stool! I wish someone would do an Annie Sloan Chalk Paint workshop here in West Chester, PA! I have wanted to try it but have been a little tentative to move away from my comfort zone. Do you have to buy it online?

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  17. I have never tried the paint and I am not a fan of brush stokes so I am glad that you told me about that! I love your stool though ... so cute!
    Hugs,
    Bj

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  18. I love your blog. I haven't tried ASCP but I do make my own and have so great success. I love the coverage and with a light sanding before waxing you get a baby smooth finish. I get the look and feel I'm going for with half the work of using latex. Quick question for you at the workshop did they cover using ASCP paint for making chalkboards? I think it can be done. On my blog I have a cornet that I painted turquoise with chalk paint that I think you'll like. I also have some projects posted to facebook http://www.facebook.com/TreChicDesigns

    Again great blog
    Tracy

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  19. I love ASCP! My first attempt was done last year and I've done several smaller pieces since. The paint does last a long time and it's pricey so I decided to make my own. I will pay for the real thing in the future! My own was much harder to use and the project was a huge fail on several aspects so I never even blogged about it as I had intended.

    Your stool looks great!

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  20. 1) How long, if at all, should you wait between coats?
    YOU NEED TO WAIT UNTIL A COAT IS DRY BEFORE YOU APPLY THE NEXT COAT. DRY TIME DEPENDS UPON WEATHER CONDITIONS. ON A HUMID DAY...DRY TIME WILL BE LONGER.

    2) What type of brush should be used? A NATURAL BRISTLE BRUSH IS THE BEST CHOICE. Annie Sloan HAS CREATED A WONDERFUL PAINT BRUSH THAT WE CARRY.

    3) What is the overall drying time? AGAIN IT VARIES, BUT CAN BE RIGHT AROUND AN HOUR.

    4) Is there a bad smell? Like if I did it inside, would my house smell like paint? NOPE. NO SMELL. LOW V.O.C.'S I PAINT INSIDE ALL THE TIME.

    5) Can it be used on walls?
    ABSOLUTELY!!!
    6) How often do you have to put on a coat of wax? Just once, or every year, etc? If so, do you strip the old wax down and re-do or just brush wax on over the paint?
    WE RECOMMEND 2 COATS OF WAX FOR END TABLES, COFFEE TABLES, ETC. HIGH USE ITEMS LIKE KITCHEN/DINING TABLES AND CABINETS REQUIRE 3 COATS OF WAX WITH 24 HOURS OF DRY TIME BETWEEN COATS. A NEW COAT OF WAX CAN BE APPLIED DIRECTLY ON TOP OF THE LAST COAT. ADD A NEW COAT ROUGHLY EVERY 3 YEARS.

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  21. Newbie question: Is the wax something specific to chalk paint? Is it what you use instead of a poly coat? Or is it a preference thing?

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  22. Morning Sarah,

    I just noticed you will be at HAVEN...I will be there also. I will be one of the Stockists representing Annie Sloan Unfolded, so be sure to find us and come say 'Hello'!! Looking forward to meeting you.
    Loved this post ...your stool is beautiful...well done and I love the stenciled number.

    janet xox
    The Empty Nest

    PS...you were so lucky to have attended Sasha's class...she is one of the best!!

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  23. WE DO SHIP!!!!
    VISIT www.restyledfurniture.com TO ORDER SECURELY ONLINE.
    OR VISIT www.anniesloanunfolded.com TO FIND A RETAILER NEAR YOU.

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  24. 1. Can the brushes be used with a natural wax? i.e one made with natural oils such as olive/walnut & beeswax
    MY HONEST ANSWER IS I DON'T KNOW. Annie's Soft Wax IS A NATURAL WAX. SAFE FOR USE ON CRIBS, BEDS AND KIDS STUFF(ONCE DRIED OF COURSE). Soft Wax IS THE CONSISTENCY OF TUB MARGARINE WHICH IS WHY THE WAX BRUSH WORKS SO WELL WITH IT. MOST OTHER FURNITURE WAXES ARE HARDER PACKED IN THEIR TINS, SO I'M NOT SURE HOW WELL THE WAX BRUSH WOULD WORK WITH IT.

    2. must it be covered with a wax for protection? HIGH-USE ITEMS REQUIRE SOME SORT OF PROTECTION. EITHER FROM THE Soft Wax OR BY SEALING IT USING ONE OF Annie's TECHNIQUES. SIGN UP FOR A WORKSHOP OR STOP BY THE SHOP TO PURCHASE Annie's "Quick And Easy Paint Transformations" BOOK TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THESE OTHER TECHNIQUES.
    LOW-USE ITEMS LIKE PICTURE FRAMES, MIRRORS OR PAINTED ACCESSORIES DO NOT NEED TO BE WAXED.

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  25. The stool looks great! I love the blue! Are you using more blue in your family room lately or am I just noticeing? Love the blue accessories in your photo. I just used Annie Sloan for the first time this week on an old dresser. Love it! We have an antique store in town that began carrying the paint this month! I have a question I wonder if you could answer...can the wax be used on other pieces that are not painted with Annie Sloan? Like over regular latex? Thanks for sharing!

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  26. Just a note, for those who can't attend a workshop or don't live near a stockist: some stockists will ship it to you. That's probably expensive, too, but it's very worth it.

    WE DO SHIP!!! SHIPPING IS REASONABLE. VISIT www.restyledfurniture.com

    OR VISITS www.anniesloanunfolded.com TO FIND A RETAILER NEAR YOU.

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  27. can the wax be used on other pieces that are not painted with Annie Sloan? Like over regular latex?
    Chalk Paint(TM) IS POROUS. THE Soft Wax ABSORBS INTO THE PAINT TO PROTECT IT. THE WAX WILL JUST LAY ON TOP OF THE LATEX, THEREFORE NOT LENDING ITSELF TO BEING VERY DURABLE OVER TIME. I WOULD NOT RECOMMEND USING IT OVER LATEX.

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  28. Quick question for you at the workshop did they cover using ASCP paint for making chalkboards? I think it can be done.
    YES ANY COLOR OF Chalk Paint(TM) CAN BE USED TO CREATE A CHALKBOARD WRITING SURFACE. SIMPLY USE 3 COATS OF Chalk Paint(TM) AND DO NOT SEAL WITH WAX. YOU'RE THEN READY TO CREATE YOUR MASTERPIECE!!!

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  29. Just a suggestion to get a perfectly smooth finish with chalk paint. If I want a dresser or a china cupboard to be smooth after I finish painting but before I wax, I use a fine grit sanding block to smooth out the brush strokes when I use Annie Sloan paint. The result finishes as smooth as glass and little prep work.

    GREAT TIP. ALSO, THERE IS A TECHNIQUE CALLED "SMOOTH" THAT WILL ACHIEVE A LOOK WITH MINIMAL BRUSH STROKES. SIGN-UP FOR A WORKSHOP WITH US!

    www.restyledfurniture.com

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  30. Newbie question: Is the wax something specific to chalk paint? Is it what you use instead of a poly coat? Or is it a preference thing?

    YES, Annie has developed Soft Wax THAT WORKS SPECIFICALLY WITH Chalk Paint(TM). IT IS THE PROTECTIVE TOP COAT. THE TWO WERE MADE AS A SYSTEM FOR EACH OTHER.

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  31. I love ASCP! I got my hands on a similar dresser you have, the Drexel that is now your media console. Mine was in rough shape but after the Annie's...beautiful. I just finished a few others including a Union Jack dresser, check it out http://pinterest.com/hafdunn/my-annie-sloan-chalk-paint-projects/

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  32. what a great project! I love how the stool turned out, and the number 1 looks awesome!

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  33. I love your blog and all the projects that you have written about! My parents live in an older home and my mom has been wanting to paint the kitchen cabinets for as long as I can remember. My dad always thought that once she painted them she would regret it but she ordered the chalk paint, painted the cabinets and everyone loves them! I think she's already planning her next chalk paint project - ill have to direct her to this blog post!

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  34. This looks fantastic! I love the blue color. I'd love it if you'd link up at Off the Hook!

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  35. Do you have any good ideas for making a sign out of a drop leaf from a table? I thought about making a sign for a friend. The table belonged to her grandmother, and she can't keep the table, but I thought having part of it would be cool to have! She likes sort of a woodsy/outdoorsy cabin theme, and I suppose I could add a few hooks for hanging stuff.... I love the stool too!

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  36. Do you have any good ideas for making a sign out of a drop leaf from a table? I thought about making a sign for a friend. The table belonged to her grandmother, and she can't keep the table, but I thought having part of it would be cool to have! She likes sort of a woodsy/outdoorsy cabin theme, and I suppose I could add a few hooks for hanging stuff.... I love the stool too!

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  37. Do you have any good ideas for making a sign out of a drop leaf from a table? I thought about making a sign for a friend. The table belonged to her grandmother, and she can't keep the table, but I thought having part of it would be cool to have! She likes sort of a woodsy/outdoorsy cabin theme, and I suppose I could add a few hooks for hanging stuff.... I love the stool too!

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  38. You got to use chalk paint! I'm so excited for you! I think it's the best thing since twist cones! Now all the items everyone else passes up because they'd be too difficult to prep are ready to be painted.

    I just did a little vanity bench with the paint names after me (Old White!) and I lightly sanded. People are not kidding - as smooth as a baby's bottom!

    I got to see a demonstration at a local barn sale. It wasn't the full on workshop (which costs $89 in our neck of the woods) but I learned a lot. I want to go ahead and take the full workshop and see what else there is to learn.

    Does anyone know if there are videos online? My memory is terrible and I'm afraid after going home from the workshop I'll remember too little.

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  39. I've not tried ASCP yet but have used a homemade recipe for chalk paint. I like the look too and yes, it really does dry quickly and goes over latex.

    I guess the reason I haven't bought any of the Annie Sloan chalk paint yet is the cost. I cannot see spending that amount on a color I may only need a teeny amount of paint for :-( With my homemade recipe I used some existing latex paint to make up the small amount I needed. I haven't tried waxing anything yet either.

    Now...about the distressing. I would love, love, love to see a chalk painted item in blog land that isn't distressed after painting! I come from a "time" when distressed (i.e. used looking) furniture was put on the "to do" paint list or relegated to a back room somewhere. Still trying to get my head around why we take the time to paint it to look old right away....hmmm...

    I suppose that thought process shows I'M old ;-) Still with that said, your stool is quite charming.

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  40. I'm a huge fan of ASCP, but still fairly new at using it too. I'm a little anal still about the brush strokes and like to cover the whole piece thoroughly with several coats and control the distressing. (Control freak!) I have to learn to let go and not be so perfect. The colours are spectacular though and I love the waxy finish.

    I've painted several things so far and will be posting shortly (which, in my timeline, is not so shortly...lol!)

    All that said, your stool turned out fantastic and really, really cute, absolutely number 1!!!

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  41. This was extremely helpful. There is a boutique that just started selling Annie Sloan paint by my house and I have been wondering how it works! Thank you!

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  42. I love how this came out! Makes me want to redo our barstool too! I have used ASCP on an antique chest I have. I bought a sample size of the paris gray and after hours and hours of sanding (which didnt remove the old finish completely) I slapped the paint on and it covered perfectly. You would never know it was any other color. And one sample size was more than enough to cover this piece (and its a good size).

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  43. Question:

    Can I use ASCP on a dresser and then use latex paint over it on some accent parts?

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  44. Love your Blog! Maybe we could follow each other?

    Don't stop to post such amazing creations! :D

    xoxo, ♥Karli♥
    http://sailerkarli.blogspot.de/

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  45. I just used a mix of barcelona orange and emperors silk annie sloan paint on a dresser and absolutely loved it! I put it's claim that you can paint it on anything to the test by putting it on a formica top, so far so good!

    Sarah Dorsey

    http://sarahmdorseydesigns.blogspot.com

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  46. Can I use ASCP on a dresser and then use latex paint over it on some accent parts?
    SURE!

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  47. I think the stool is fabulous. I also love the idea of no prep work! I may have missed it, but how long did this project take - including time waiting for the paint to dry?

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  48. This paint is taking blog land by storm! I just ordered some and received it today. I'm going to paint a garage sale dresser I picked up for $20. Can't wait!! Love the stool and color. Isn't it great when we can give an old, tired piece a new lease on life?!

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  49. lovely, however I do not want the brush strokes so sanding is the best way before wax? also all say no preparation, will it cover over peeling paint or should it be sanded first?

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  50. Oooh, I've been wanting to try milk paint for sooo long now! I love how your stool turned out- so adorable!- so I DEFINITELY need to try it!

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  51. I'll post my experience with the paint-- I'm sure it will help others! I have used the ivory color (forget the name of it!)-- I attempted it first on a kitchen cabinet and just recently on a dresser. Here is my experience-- I have found that unless your wooden object has NO stains or any chance of oil/grease that have seeped into the wood, then you should be good. But if there is ANY chance of stains/oil-- then you really need to prime. Otherwise, the stains/oil seeps right through VERY easily. On the dresser, I didn't think there would be any issue-- I lightly sanded before hand and then applied the paint. LOTS of bleed through of stains and stuff. I ended up sanding lots of it off, priming, and then reapplying the chalk paint, finally waxing. MUCH better. So beware that it is not necessarily a non-priming paint!

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  52. Just a perfect chair not only for kids but also for adults as well. I might say you have it just right.

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  53. lovely, however I do not want the brush strokes so sanding is the best way before wax? also all say no preparation, will it cover over peeling paint or should it be sanded first?

    TO DECREASE BRUSH STROKES USE THE SMOOTH TECHNIQUE. YOU CAN LEARN MORE ABOUT THIS TECHNIQUE BY READING Annie's book "Quick and Easy Paint Transformations". OR ATTEND A WORKSHOP AT YOUR LOCAL Chalk Paint(TM) STOCKIST.
    FIND YOUR LOCAL STOCKIST AT www.anniesloanunfolded.com

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  54. I'll post my experience with the paint-- I'm sure it will help others! I have used the ivory color (forget the name of it!)-- I attempted it first on a kitchen cabinet and just recently on a dresser. Here is my experience-- I have found that unless your wooden object has NO stains or any chance of oil/grease that have seeped into the wood, then you should be good. But if there is ANY chance of stains/oil-- then you really need to prime. Otherwise, the stains/oil seeps right through VERY easily. On the dresser, I didn't think there would be any issue-- I lightly sanded before hand and then applied the paint. LOTS of bleed through of stains and stuff. I ended up sanding lots of it off, priming, and then reapplying the chalk paint, finally waxing. MUCH better. So beware that it is not necessarily a non-priming paint!

    SOME OF THE LIGHTER COLOR LIKE "Old White" CAN HAVE A BLEED-THROUGH AFFECT. ESPECIALLY IF YOU USE IT ON MAHOGANY. TO SOLVE THIS USE A CLEAR SHELLAC SPRAY(AVAILABLE AT ANY HARDWARE STORE) FIRST. THEN PAINT ON....MY FRIEND!!!! THE SHELLAC SEALS IN THE TANNINS IN THE WOOD AND REACT WITH THE PAINT TO CREATE THE BLEED THROUGH.

    SECONDLY, YOU MUST HAVE A CLEAN SURFACE FOR THE PAINT TO ADHERE TO. KITCHEN CABINETS MUST BE DE-GREASED AND CLEANED WELL BEFORE YOU START. I GIVE ALL MY FURNITURE A BATH(GOOD SCRUB) BEFORE I START. YOU NEVER KNOW WHAT KIND OF LIFE THESE FURNITURE PIECES HAVE LEAD BEFORE YOU GOT YOUR CREATIVE HANDS ON THEM!

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  55. will it cover over peeling paint or should it be sanded first?

    PEELING PAINT SHOULD BE REMOVED. NO NEED TO BREAK OUT THE POWER SANDER; JUST USE SOMETHING TO GET RID OF THE FLAKING STUFF.

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  56. Hi Sarah,

    My name is Mara Greenwald and I am reaching out to you on behalf of Procter & Gamble. I really enjoyed reading this post. We would love to have you join our blogger outreach program.

    If you are interested, please reach out to me at mgreenwald@bluechipww.com. I look forward to working with you!

    Best,
    Mara Greenwald on behalf of P&G

    ReplyDelete
  57. The stool turned out wonderfully! Distressing it really added the perfect touch. It's great when you can uses pieces like that to not only add more seating or table-top space in your home, but add personality as well. Love it!

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  58. i've never used annie sloan paint but have heard so many great things about it. i think i found my weekend project!
    xoxo
    ali

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  60. My daughter is moving into a college apartment in August, so we have been garage sale shopping for furniture. We bought a wood-look laminate bookshelf, a 1980s oak nightstand and a 1960s whiteish bed and dresser. We decided to try the ASCP to unify the look and hopefully save us time. After purchasing a quart of Paris gray and a sample size of Emile (for inside of headboard shelves) from ReStyled we got started. We did lightly sand all the pieces since it seemed most were possibly laminated and power tools are fun to use!. I admit the paint and wax were expensive (much more than the furniture!) but all I can say is WOW. The nasty laminate bookshelf looks brand new. The bed is amazing and so modern...this is not just for distressed furniture. We saved hours of labor, and still have paint left. Beware though, don't let your children do the waxing- my daughter used almost the entire can of wax. It looks great, but she was a bit heavy handed. I'm already planning to paint my kitchen table.

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  61. nice posting.. thanks for sharing.

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  62. Wow! This post makes me want to scour secondhand shops for stools! It turned out beautifully. Great work.

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  63. I haven't tried ASCP but I have made my own as per some online recipes and it turned out great! One question though, I used a dark blue color and when I sand over it to smooth out, I'm left with white dusty streaks all over. How do I eliminate that and still have a smooth finish before putting on the wax? Would love some info, thanks!

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  64. Great post! I've been upcycling furniture for a while now and I've fought the ASCP craze until a few days ago while I tried a sample can of Florence. I loved the color so much I had to have it and now I'm hooked. I'm afraid of the brush strokes too, but the great thing about ASCP is that there are so many ways to use it. if you use a foam roller it gives it a modern, smooth, slick finish. I wrote my own review of my first ASCP experience, http://bmorenestled.wordpress.com/2012/11/19/my-first-annie-sloan-experience/
    Would love for your feed back!

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  65. Just wondering about the coverage in one quart of ASCP. I have a desk/hutch that could really use some paint (it is that ugly 80s oak), but I don't want to have to buy two quarts for it if at all possible.

    *I love, love, love your stool! My favorite shade of blue.

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  66. What a lovely blog post and transformation. We're a stockist for ASCP and we look to see how others use this amazing paint :)

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